How the Metaverse Will Affect Education – Época Negócios

Coding students take part in the Digital House Metaverse class at Horizon Workrooms (Photo: Disclosure/Digital House)

Imagine you are an astronomy student. In a class in the Milky Way, the teacher took the class to the soil of Mars, traveled through the rings of Saturn, and learned about Pluto up close. You and your classmates can see every detail and feel like you’ve literally been in space without ever leaving the classroom.

This is one of the possible applications metaverse exist educate. Since last October, when Facebook announced the name change Target, which is one of the main areas that the novelty has shaken. Researchers in the field have envisioned, technology Coming soon, with the pandemic and the reduction of in-person classes, this process has accelerated. Now, with the return of face-to-face teaching, the market is experimenting with new formats and teaching models.

drug

In Brazil, pioneering initiatives such as Medical room Leading the way in this movement. Founded in 2016, Edtech provides medical education training through virtual reality glasses. Its platform has a human anatomy laboratory, an office for clinical simulation of patient care, and a slide center for examinations.

Biologist Vinicius Gusmão, CEO and co-founder of the startup, said one of the advantages of virtual lab classes is the ability to navigate realistic anatomy in a living human body, which is not possible in ordinary classrooms — – Observations are usually made with cadavers or mannequins.

The Virtual Human Anatomy Lab provides a realistic view of the human body.

MedRoom’s virtual human anatomy lab promises to provide a realistic view of the living human body that is impossible in face-to-face teaching.

In MedRoom's metaverse, students can perform clinical simulations of patient care.

In MedRoom’s metaverse, students can perform clinical simulations of patient care.

“The Metaverse presents a different way of interacting with content that is more immersive than the two-dimensional format of a computer,” he said. “The idea is to enable activities that are not possible in face-to-face classrooms or distance teaching.” Another example given by biologists is MRI training. Traditionally, the course is based on multi-million dollar equipment that involves radiation, which can pose health risks to students.

For Gusmão, virtual reality appears to make learning safer and more efficient. The best format, he said, was a hybrid, a mix of in-person and virtual classes, and applications that “make sense.”

data programming

Digital House teachers take students to the Metaverse to demystify the programming market (Photo: Disclosure/Digital House)

Digital House teachers take students to the Metaverse to demystify the programming market (Photo: Disclosure/Digital House)

This digital houseis an intensive course startup focused on programming and data, founded in 2016, and it has been sparking the same discussion: “What’s the real value of wearing virtual reality glasses to class?” CEO Sebastian Mai asked Sebastian Mackinlay. “It takes time and investment, and it has to be valuable content.”

In the company, some teachers incorporate their experience into the curriculum in a timely manner. “The first stage is experimentation, demystifying the subject, understanding how to do things, what limitations are there,” he commented. According to the entrepreneurs, students gave positive feedback and expressed interest in new concepts.

product development

exist Senai Cimatec University Centerexist SaviorVirtual reality has been incorporated into product development courses for engineering students and also used in workshops at different levels of training.

For Ingrid Winkler, the project’s lead researcher, while there is realism in virtual worlds, there is also the fantasy aspect of “not having to obey the laws of physics”, which provides another way of looking at things. The environment creates more attention and connection within the classroom than distance teaching.

Students without a virtual reality accessory can take a Senai Cimatec class using a regular computer (Photo: Publicity/Senai Cimatec)

Students without a virtual reality accessory can take a Senai Cimatec class using a regular computer (Photo: Publicity/Senai Cimatec)

To realize all these benefits, challenges remain. “The technology is not mature enough,” said Ingrid, who was interviewed business season Horizon Workrooms Metaverse, where Cimatec events take place. “There’s an ergonomic and physical issue, the glasses are heavy and the eyes are dry. We’re looking at how far we can take advantage of this technology.”

Another concern is to avoid overstimulation in the virtual space, so as not to intoxicate the user with the possibilities. “It is necessary to calibrate this so as not to distract from the content and skills to be developed in the classroom.”

For experts, the metaverse difference is a sense of presence, attention and connection within the classroom (Photo: Disclosure / Digital House)

For experts, the metaverse difference is a sense of presence, attention and connection within the classroom (Photo: Disclosure / Digital House)

The last hurdle, and perhaps the most decisive, is getting glasses and gloves.all case The accessories mentioned in this article are limited, and for students without accessories, participation can be done through a computer or mobile phone screen. However, the expectation is that these devices will become popular.

“As with all new technologies, both hardware and software need to evolve to make the experience complete. Discussions are in full swing in the US and I believe it will become a reality within the next 12 months,” predicts CEO Sebastian Mackinlay .

Researcher Ingrid Winkler added: “People like to be part of the experience and see new possibilities”. “People bought the idea and now just need to create the solution”, concludes biologist Vinicius Gusmão.

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